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The Soviet Shaska (or) Russian Dragoon Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-123)


Special thanks to KRIS


This reproduction Soviet Shaska or Russian Dragoon Saber features reproduced Red Army markings that would have been seen on production blades. The stamping features the Hammer and Sickle of the CCCP with a 1934 production date. Soviet state symbols are featured on the pommel and the sword is adorned with additional Cyrillic marking throughout. The blade is of tempered carbon steel with a deep fuller. The hilt and scabbard accents are of brass and the grip is of painted carved wood. The scabbard is wood-core covered in black leather.

British General 1831 Mameluke Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-127)

 

Special thanks to KULT OF ATHENA (USA)


British General 1831 Mameluke Saber (US-S-127) :: At first glance this sword may appear to be a Mameluke saber, but a closer look at the blade bears the etched markings of the crown of the British Empire. This British adoption of an Eastern design is a reflection of Britain’s worldly Empire, its spoils after the defeat of Napoleon. When Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington became Commander in Chief in 1827, he would be seen carrying a Mameluke sword gifted to him by an Indian Potentate. No doubt influenced by him, by 1831 the Mameluke-hilted saber would become the regulation sword for officers of Major-General and above.


This reproduction of this unique sword of the British Empire bears the crossed Marshal’s baton and sword etched into the blade of unsharpened, tempered high carbon steel. The crossguard and brass accents of the hilt are brass and the grip is faux ivory. The scabbard is of brass with two suspension rings. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the crossguard from colliding into the brass throat of the scabbard.

Austro Hungarian Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-111)


Special thansk to MR. SKALLAGRIM NILSSON


Napoleon may have been won many battles with the cold calculation of artillery, but a general who won his victories with daring horse-and-sword Hussar cavalry was Andreas Graf Hadik of Austria. At the epitome of his career in 1757 he deftly plucked Berlin from Prussia with a hoof-pounding raid around Prussian armies to take Berlin. Hadik’s Hussar’s smashed the Berlin garrison regiments asunder with a daring charge through their center ranks. Deemed an impossible feat, Hadik’s gutsy move was a moment of great embarressment to Frederick the Great. In a world of weighted shot and calculated cannon this was a harkening to the chivalric panache of earlier warriors. This Austro-Hungarian saber is akin to the sword Hadik would have wielded.


This Officers Saber of the Austro-Hungarian Hussars is made with a tempered high-carbon steel blade that has been etched with a sun, moon, saber and slogan. The blade, engraved in the fuller with latin reads: ‘’Andreas comes Hadik Generalis Campi Marschallus Excelsi Consily Aulae Bellici Supremus Praeses’’ – It identifies itself as the sword of Hadik, a General of warfare. The hilt is in brass with a ribbed leather grip embellished with stars of brass. The wood-core scabbard is covered in leather and ornamented in brass with two brass rings.

1796 Pattern British Light Cavalry Sabre | Universal Swords (US-S-133)


Special thanks to KRIS


This 1796 British Light Cavalry Saber had a more pronounced curve, making slashing easier and deadly. The saber, somewhat unusually among its peers, also widened at its tip, putting weight and heft at the tip making its slashes more vicious. This reproduction British 1796 Cavalry Saber is made with tempered high carbon steel blade. The hilt is of steel and the grip is of tightly molded, ribbed black leather. The scabbard is of steel with two suspension rings. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the cross guard from colliding into the steel throat of the scabbard.

Napoleonic Mameluke Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-128)


Special thanks to MR. THOMAS GAVELINS


This reproduction Napoleonic Mameluke Saber has a blade of tempered high carbon steel. The spine is etched with the signature of Klingenthal, the guard is made of brass and the grip is of wood sandwiched between the tang and brass mid-section. Brass pins hold the tang in place. The wood-core scabbard is tightly covered in black leather with overlaid brass accents and brass hanging rings.

Transylvanian (or) Hungarian Cavalry Sabre | Universal Swords (US-S-171)


Special thanks to KRIS


This reproduction Hungarian Cavalry Saber bears markings commemorating the merger of Transylvania into larger Hungary following Hungary's 1848 revolution against Hapsburg Austria. The blade bears other nationalistic symbols and slogans. The blade of this reproduced Hungarian Cavalry Saber is high carbon steel that is tempered. The hilt is brass with a ribbed leather grip inlaid with brass wire. The scabbard is steel with two suspension rings. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the crossguard from colliding into the metal throat of the scabbard.

British Cutlass | Universal Swords (US-S-176)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


The Cutlass; the iconic sword of the seaman. Simple and effective, its robust design was used by Western navies for centuries. It was short for the close quarters of ship fighting, yet not so long as to be tangled in rigging or disadvantaged belowdecks. British, American and Australian navies were still doing routine cutlass drills for their sailors into the early years of the 20th century. It was not until 1936 that the Royal Navy officially relegated the cutlass to a ceremonial weapon.


This reproduction Cutlass Sword, features a tempered high carbon blade that has been blackened. The hilt is of steel with a grip of brown painted wood sandwiched over the riveted tang. It comes with a leather and riveted scabbard with brass mounts.

1803 Pattern British Infantry Sword (1st Part) | Universal Swords (US-S-144)


Special thanks to MR RANDY HIGGINS


The 1803 Pattern British Infantry Officer’s Sword was a response to a needed design change in swords. The official 1796 sword was a thin-bladed straight sword, regarded as wholly inadequate for light infantry and riflemen officers who, separated from the dense masses of line infantry and their bayonets, were vulnerable to the fast sabers of light cavalry. Many officers would replace the 1796 with a blade that they purchased, usually a saber with enough heft to parry those wielded by their cavalry foes, and in particular Napoleon's elite skirmishers, among them the Voltiguers. The 1803 Pattern was a final standardization of this trend, finally providing the light infantry officers the sword they needed.


This reproduction 1803 Infantry Officer’s sword is made with tempered high carbon steel blade. The hilt is of brass, featuring the symbolic regalia of the British Crown. The grip is of ribbed black leather wrapped with inlaid steel wire. It comes with a leather scabbard with brass accents and two hanging rings. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the crossguard from colliding into the brass throat of the scabbard.

Japanese NCO "Shin Gunto" Sword | Universal Swords (US-S-116)


Special thanks to MR. THOMAS GAVELINS


This reproduction Japanese NCO Sword features markings seen on existing Shin Gunto. These mass-produced military ''Shin Gunto'' swords substituted the complex hilt construction of traditional blades with an aluminum-cast painted false ''Tsuka-Ito'' lacing. The blades were stamped with factory numbers and the hilt and scabbard feature a simple locking mechanism. The blade is made from tempered high-carbon steel and the scabbard is steel with a wood-core and drab-painted exterior and the tsuba is of brass.

Indian Damascus Dagger | Universal Swords


Special thanks to KULT OF ATHENA (USA)


The metal hilt of the dagger is decorated with silver through the process of ‘’koftgari’’. This laborious and age-old process involves carefully pounding-in thin metal wire onto the hilt and scabbard, and then annealing the metals together in an oven. In this case, silver has been worked into the hilt and scabbard of this dagger.


The metal scabbard has been lined with red velvet and was extensively decorated with silver koftgari inlay. Altogether, this dagger is an example of the the ancient blade making and decorating techniques of Indian pattern-welded damascus and koftgari.

Russian Imperial Dragoon Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-124)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


After 1881, Russian cavalry received a new sword; the 1881 model Russian cavalry saber. They also received a new designation - Dragoon. All Russian cavalry were re-organized into Dragoon units - a tactical nod to the growing difficulties traditional cavalry had with newer, modernizing infantry and artillery arms.


This reproduction model 1881 Russian Cavalry Saber has an unsharpened blade of tempered high carbon steel. The blade is stamped with Cyrillic script and a 1892 production marking. The hilt is of brass and the grip is brown-painted carved wood. The wood-core scabbard is covered in black leather and overlaid with brass accents. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the crossguard from colliding into the brass throat of the scabbard.

French Infantry Briquet | Universal Swords (US-S-156)


Special thanks to KRIS


The Grenadier regiments of Emperor Napoleon were equipped with these short sabers. They were not regarded as effective weapons, but the elite troops liked them - probably as a status symbol akin to the sabers worn by the elite cavalry. These sabers found a secondary function as a camp tool for splitting firewood. This reproduction Briquet saber is made from tempered high carbon steel with an all-brass hilt. The scabbard is of black leather with brass fittings.

Turkish Kilij | Universal Swords (US-S-711)


Special thanks to KULT OF ATHENA (USA)


This Turkish Kilij has a blade forged from 1065 high carbon steel and features the traditional Kilij T-section blade spine geometry - a novel design development which both strengthens the blade spine and adds rigidity while minimizing overall weight. This spine cross section transitions into a flared yalman which both increases its cutting power in this wide blade area and will slash deeply with this strongly curved section of the blade. The flattened profile also minimizes blade drag as it passes through a target.


The crossguard and grip accents are brass and the grip itself is well-carved and polished wood. A pre-drilled hole allows for the addition of your own lanyard, sword knot or tassel. The blade tang is stoutly riveted directly with the wood grip halves to create an altogether robust sword construction. The sword is paired with a handcrafted companion scabbard of wood which is bound in black leather and completed with brass fittings and brass hanging rings.

Royal Navy 1804 Pattern Boarding Cutlass | Universal Swords (US-S-153)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


This Royal Navy 1804 pattern cutlass has one innovation that makes it a true tailor-made sea-blade; A cast-iron grip. The rapid fluctuations in temperature and humidity at sea wrought havoc on wooden grips – an iron grip greatly extended the life of the cutlass, saving the state money and keeping the amount of action-ready blades in a ship’s armory to a maximum.

Swedish Military Sword Komissvarja M/1685 | Universal Swords (GS-US-1685)


Special thanks to MR. THOMAS GAVELINS


The reproduction of Komissvarja M/1685 sword has done by Universal Swords in the great guidance of Mr. Thomas. It is a very good re-production of a very popular and rare Swedish Military Sword. Superb replica on the most common sword of Charles XII Carolines. 89cm blade of high carbon steel with stamps on both sides. Fitting in blackened iron and rolling pin wrapped with brass. Weight 1.200 kg. Whole sword measuring 105 cm. Balance point about 11 cm from the guard. Scabbard of wood covered in leather and with mouthpiece and chape of steel included.

French Infantry Officer Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-165)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


This French Infantry Officer’s Saber was of the type carried by Napoleon’s light infantry; The Voltigeurs, Carabinier, and Chasseurs. They would have likely crossed blades with the British 1803 saber. The sword is gently curved to deliver a deadly slash, but not so much as to deter from its ability to thrust with the point. These French sabers were also popular in the United States where notable commanders Oliver Hazard Perry, Captain Samuel Chester Reid and Privateer General Armstrong carried this sword.


This reproduction of the French Infantry Officer’s Saber is made with a blade of unsharpened, tempered high carbon steel. The hilt is of brass, with a wooden grip finished in black. It comes with a leather scabbard with brass accents. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the crossguard from colliding into the brass throat of the scabbard.

British Heavy Cavalry Pattern 1796 Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-134)


Special thanks to KULT OF ATHENA (USA)


A robust backsword, the model 1796 cavalry sword was regarded as too heavy for delicate, gentlemanly swordsmanship - which was precisely why the regiments of Dragoons, Life Guards and Royal Horse Guards liked it. Thick, straight-bladed and powerful, the 1796 sword could cleave through foes with abandon from horseback. Sgt. Charles Ewart of the Scots Greys 2nd Dragoons captured a French Imperial Eagle Standard during Waterloo wielding the 1796 sword. He had to defeat several soldiers fanatically defending the regimental symbol they had pledged their lives to defend. This sword is featured in Bernard Cornwell’s Sharpe novel series as the protagonist, Richard Sharpe of the 95th Rifles, wields this sword in the Napoleonic Wars.


This 1796 Heavy Cavalry Sword blade is made from tempered high carbon steel. The hilt is of steel with a ribbed leather grip. The scabbard is of steel with ring mounts.

Indian Damascus Talwar | Universal Swords


Special thanks to KULT OF ATHENA (USA)


The Damascus steel blade is crafted from the melding of two different steels into a single billet from which the smith forges the blade; the mixed steel leaves a vibrantly visible rippled patterning on the blade surface. Traditionally this was a technique done to merge harder and softer steels into a single blade to impart it with both a hardness for durability and edge retention and a degree of softness to prevent the blade from becoming brittle.


This was done to get good results from the quality of iron available for smithing. Damascus is now technically inferior to pure steel made from modern industrial-scale methods, but it is still desired as the beauty of Damascus is instantly notable and is a testament to the skill of the smith who forged it with the traditional methods.


The elegant and intricate design and patterning on the hilt was created with the laborious ‘’Koftgari’’ technique; a traditional process exemplified by Indian smiths whereby a design is chiselled and etched and then strands of wire, in this case silver wire, is carefully hammered into the etched design. The hilt is then heated in a kiln and the silver wire is then permanently annealed into a permanent design.


The patterning of the damascus blade varies with each blade in much the same manner as all fingerprints differ. Also the Koftgari designs are made to the individual design and artistry of the smith. Therefore every one of the swords of this type are uniquely crafted and are a testament to the traditional swordsmithing techniques of India.

French Hussar Saber | Universal Swords (US-S-161)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


This French Hussar saber is similar to other Hussar and cavalry sabers of the period who share a common ancestor in the Polish-Hungarian ''Szabla''. After centuries of mounted warfare, the Szabla became the Hussar saber, ideally evolved for light cavalry combat. Its characteristic curve allowed for deathly sweeping slashes from on high. Its design highly influenced the British 1796 Light Cavalry Saber - a design destined to spread throughout the continent and to the United States.


This Hussar Saber reproduction is crafted with a high carbon steel. The blade boldly bears the markings of Klingenthal, the state-run sword manufacturer of France. The blade is also stamped with two period inspection markings on the base of the blade. The hilt is made of brass and the grip is ribbed, thick black leather is inlaid with brass wire. The wood-core scabbard is wrapped with black leather and significantly overlaid with an elongated brass throat and chape with two suspension rings. A leather washer is fitted to the base of the blade to protect the crossguard from the brass scabbard throat.

1803 Pattern British Infantry Sword (2nd Part) | Universal Swords (US-S-144)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


The 1803 Pattern British Infantry Officer’s Sword was a response to a needed design change in swords. The official 1796 sword was a thin-bladed straight sword, regarded as wholly inadequate for light infantry and riflemen officers who, separated from the dense masses of line infantry and their bayonets, were vulnerable to the fast sabers of light cavalry. Many officers would replace the 1796 with a blade that they purchased, usually a saber with enough heft to parry those wielded by their cavalry foes, and in particular Napoleon's elite skirmishers, among them the Voltiguers. The 1803 Pattern was a final standardization of this trend, finally providing the light infantry officers the sword they needed.


This reproduction 1803 Infantry Officer’s sword is made with tempered high carbon steel blade. The hilt is of brass, featuring the symbolic regalia of the British Crown. The grip is of ribbed black leather wrapped with inlaid steel wire. It comes with a leather scabbard with brass accents and two hanging rings. A leather washer at the base of the blade protects the crossguard from colliding into the brass throat of the scabbard.

Infantry Napoleonic Saber Briquet | Universal Swords (US-S-156)


Special thanks to MR. RANDY HIGGINS


The Grenadier regiments of Emperor Napoleon were equipped with these short sabers. They were not regarded as effective weapons, but the elite troops liked them - probably as a status symbol akin to the sabers worn by the elite cavalry. These sabers found a secondary function as a camp tool for splitting firewood. This reproduction Briquet saber is made from tempered high carbon steel with an all-brass hilt. The scabbard is of black leather with brass fittings.

Russo-Japanese Kyu Gunto Army Sword | Universal Swords (US-S-118)


Special thanks to MR. SKALLAGRIM NILSSON


Russo-Japanese Kyu Gunto Army Sword is called Kyu gunto or ‘’Russo-Japanese’’ swords, these katana and western saber hybrid swords were used by Japanese Army and Naval officers in WWII, the earlier Russo-Japanese war and Imperial Japan’s colonial conflicts. They were produced from 1875 until 1934 and existed alongside the more traditional looking Shin-Gunto swords. All officers in the military were required to wear a sword as a badge of rank. The one offered here is in the style of the army Kyu-Gunto, for it has the more extensive grip backplate - the naval variants had typically slimmer backplates.


This Kyu gunto Russo-Japanese sword has a unsharpened, tempered blade of high carbon steel. The hilt is of brass lavishly adorned with cherry blossoms. The grip is of hardened brown leather with inlaid copper wire. The scabbard is of steel with a steel hanging ring. The sword has a locking mechanism that holds the scabbard to the hilt. A small cherry-blossom etched button beneath the guard releases the scabbard.